August 31st, 2005

stream of conciousness

awake
discomfort
pain
hunger
late
iritation
cute
attraction
amused
frustration
distraction
ignore
ignored
ignoring
storm
power
attraction
forbiden
dream
friends
happy
strange
random
home
homeless
heart
done

okay force fields...now if we can just shrink it to personal My career as a superhero can begin.

http://amasci.com/weird/unusual/e-wall.html


SESSION 7: SPECIAL SESSION, 17th Annual EOS/ESD Symposium
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1995, 8:00 am

SESSION 7: SPECIAL SESSION: ELECTROSTATIC CONSIDERATIONS IN INDUSTRY

MODERATOR: D. Swenson, 3M

7.7 CASE STUDY - LARGE PLASTIC WEB ELECTROSTATIC PROBLEMS, RESULTS AND
CURE, D. Swenson, 3M Company
Tremendous static charge generation on a plastic web causes unique
physical phenomena and special problems. Solution was simple and cost
effective.

David Swenson of 3M Corporation describes an anomaly where workers encountered a strange "invisible wall" in the area under a fast-moving sheet of electrically charged polypropelene film in a factory. This "invisible wall" was strong enough to prevent humans from passing through. A person near this "wall" was unable to turn, and so had to walk backwards to retreat from it.

This occurred in late summer in South Carolina, in extremely high humidity. Polypropelene (PP) film on 50K ft. rolls 20ft wide was being slit and transferred to multiple smaller spools. The film was taken off the main roll at high speed, flowed upwards 20ft to overhead rollers, passed horizontally 20ft and then downwards to the slitting device, where it was spooled onto shorter rolls. The whole operation formed a cubical shaped tent, with two walls and a ceiling approximately 20ft square. The spools ran at 1000ft/min, or about 10MPH. The PP film had been manufactured with dissimilar surface structure on opposing faces. Contact electrification can occur even in similar materials if the surface textures or micro-structures are significantly different. The generation of a large imbalance of electrical surface-charge during unspooling was therefor not unexpected, and is a common problem in this industry. "Static cling" in the megavolt range! Collapse )